Entretanto, Parece Escassear Interesse Em Outras Coisas

O comunicado já tem umas semanas. Agora imaginem que o shôr ministro não era “cientista”.

COMUNICADO SOBRE A ENTREGA DOS PRÉMIOS DA 16ª EDIÇÃO DO PRÉMIO FUNDAÇÃO ILÍDIO PINHO “CIÊNCIA NA ESCOLA”

Como até ao momento não foi possível obter disponibilidade do Ministério da Educação para a renovação do Acordo de Colaboração na continuidade do Projeto “Ciência na Escola”, com o objetivo de prosseguir o empreendedorismo científico escolar integrado com os ecossistemas das universidades e, destas, com as comunidades que as envolvem, tendo em vista o upgrade da cultura científica e tecnológica nacional, entende a Fundação Ilídio Pinho:

1. Não haver ainda condições para anunciar a 17ª edição do Prémio (2019/20).

2. Não haver condições para encerrar a 16ª edição com a habitual Mostra Nacional.

(…)

Ciencia

O Futuro É Ali

It’s 2059, and the Rich Kids Are Still Winning

Editors’ note: This is the first installment in a new series, “Op-Eds From the Future,” in which science fiction authors, futurists, philosophers and scientists write op-eds that they imagine we might read 10, 20 or even 100 years in the future. The challenges they predict are imaginary — for now — but their arguments illuminate the urgent questions of today and prepare us for tomorrow. The opinion piece below is a work of fiction.

Future

Ciência Vs Preconceito

White Supremacists Have Stumbled Into a Huge Issue in Genetic Ancestry Testing

Neo-Nazis, it turns out, dig gene tests—but they often don’t like the results. Two sociologists, Aaron Panofsky and Joan Donovan, plowed through years of posts on the white-supremacist website Stormfront in search of accounts of people taking genetic ancestry tests to prove their whiteness. The pair tracked 153 users who’d gotten tested as they discussed their results across 3,000 posts on the site. About two-thirds of them were disappointed with the results, which found that they had something other than white European ancestry in their genome. An excellent piece in Stat on the work talks about how the online community dealt with inconvenient findings. Suffice it to say, things quickly got weird.

ADN